Luz 2.0 in the wild

December 27, 2014

Luz 2.0 was used for its first live performance recently, by Josh Fitz of LightTroupe.

Luz 2.0 is getting very, very fun!

Luz 2.0 takes the pure-Ruby engine of Luz 1.0 and all its plugins, drops the GTK interface, and replaces it with a custom fullscreen animated interface.  So go ahead and stay in beautiful color-world.

Screenshot from 2014-12-27 04:09:50More screenshots: http://lighttroupe.tumblr.com

Luz 2.0 User Interface Design Goals
– stay with the visuals, no leaving play mode to edit
– show all edits immediately
– be as simple and consistent as possible
– all value changes should be smooth and “playable” for creating Luz sets live as a new form of performance
– all behaviors should live behind a checkbox that can turn them off: it allows for learning how something works without altering it irrevocably
– the most common operations should be easiest, for example animating a setting to the beat is a single click
– a simpler technology stack, making it easier to run Luz on OSX or run Luz on Windows (help wanted, contact me)

The Heart of Luz 2.0

luz-2.0-user-obect-editor

This is the object editor, and it’s basically the only thing to learn, because all editing you do uses this editor, from configuring human input to tweaking the settings of pixel-bending shaders.

In this screenshot, we’re editing a rectangle actor which is showing a movie. The Scan Lines Horizontal plugin is selected, and its size setting is being changed.

Luz 2.0 is on GitHub. The goal is to make life more beautiful and fun, and so Luz is free and open source software, and you are welcome to project it on the wall at your next house party, to use it for live performance, even to earn money with it.


Luz project moves to GitHub and debuts Video File, Webcam, and Chipmunk 2D Physics support

December 4, 2012

The repository is:

https://github.com/lighttroupe/luz

This is the new home of the Luz project.

The git repository includes several features developed behind the scenes in LightTroupe Labs.

Enjoy!


Luz Studio – Open Source Live Motion Graphics now packaged for Ubuntu

April 1, 2012

Luz just got an easy-to-install package, and I would appreciate your help testing it out!

Luz still doesn’t run on 11.10 or newer, due to lp:850734, so you’ll need an 11.04 system.

The PPA is:
deb http://ppa.launchpad.net/ian-mcintosh/software/ubuntu natty main

Once you’ve got it installed, you might enjoy the Luz tutorial videos!

Luz open source project page.

Thanks!


Studly – the little study buddy that could – Translators Needed!

November 23, 2011

Translations are underway, and some are 100% done:
http://translations.launchpad.net/studly

Is your language?

Some languages *were* done, then I tried them in Studly and realized I had missed some strings.

Thanks for your contributions!!

If you’re interested in making desktop apps with a most beautiful and sexy programming language (Ruby), I encourage you to check out the code to Studly– it’s under 500 lines, fairly clear, and accomplishes a lot.

http://code.launchpad.net/~ian-mcintosh/studly/trunk


GNOME ScreenRuler translation question

August 17, 2011

GNOME ScreenRuler‘s translation effort on launchpad.net seems to be going well. Many languages are mostly done.

I’ve noticed that many translators are avoiding this translation item:

Read the rest of this entry »


Luz Studio – Physics Game Engine Development Update [VIDEO]

August 14, 2011

Luz is an open source live motion graphics studio and game development platform.

Watch on YouTube.

Luz Studio project page.


Luz Studio – [video] live painting and gaming at ReallyBIGVideo

July 10, 2011

My LightTroupe co-conspirators and I had the opportunity to bring some Luz live motion-graphics fun to ReallyBigVideo for Portland’s “First Thursday” event:

As always, our guests take control:

Open sauce for the childrens.

Helmets recommended.

El Maestro.

Experimenting with new types of live-visuals gaming.

The shooter game on the right screen in the video below is written within Luz, as a plugin.

Each game character is created visually as a normal Actor in Luz Studio. The game code is Ruby, and can be changed and reloaded without restarting Luz Studio.

We are literally creating games live, and people can even play the game while it’s being created. What..!? Is this much fun supposed to be possible?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aN1FeoHmGpk

The mural on the left projector is being drawn live (tired of this word yet?), in a Luz Studio-created painting activity.

OK so… who wants to join the Too Much Fun Club?

See Luz Tutorials and Luz project page for install instructions.